Mini Book Review: Highland Fling

I just wanted to say that I was wrong, I had not already read Highland Fling by Katie Fforde. It was another romance about a Scottish woolen mill that needed saving that I had read (which of course I cannot remember its title). I thoroughly enjoyed Highland Fling, however, and it was even plausible that the heroine would go off for a walk up a mountain in the snow on Christmas Day, thereby necessitating her rescue by the book’s hero. Which is (the plausibility) a good trick to pull off in a romance novel.

Back to remembering a title: I cannot for the life of me remember book titles, authors’ names, song titles, or artists’ names. I remember things about the books or songs, but never useful things that you can actually look up (what I remember about the book I cannot remember: the hero had black hair, the mill was at the bottom of a steep hill, and I think the hero’s name started with D. It’s possible that it was a Robin Pilcher novel, but I think there is a Robin Pilcher novel that fits the bill and there is yet another novel that is the one I am thinking of. This is why I make lists of books and authors — I can never remember enough to remember which book I want to read.) This is one of the reasons I started this blog — if I liked it enough to review it, I might want to remember it someday. Will I be able to search the blog and find it? I’ve never had to find out.

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2 Comments

  1. jaristophanes

     /  April 22, 2012

    Of course Scots go hill-walking in the snow on Christmas. We also take a loony dook in the freezing sea on New Year’s Day.

    We’re hardcore!

    Reply
    • Nothing wrong with hillwalking on Christmas if you’re a Scot. Presumably you’ve done it before and know what you’re doing.

      In the book, the heroine goes alone and wears never-before worn boots and it’s the first time she’s gone hillwalking & she’s from the Home Counties of England. This is a set-up. I love it though when an author is clever enough to pull off a set-up without the reader realizing it until much later.

      Reply

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