Homonyms: English Words That are the Same, but Different

English: This is a Venn diagram showing the re...

Image via Wikipedia

I was researching homonyms today. If you’re not familiar with the word homonym (or you just don’t remember 5th grade English class), a homonym is a word in English that sounds the same as another word, but is spelled differently and has a different meaning. The most common set of homonyms is to, too, and two. Which of course mean towards, also, and a pair.

In the course of my research, I found a couple websites I want to share with you. Alan Cooper’s Homonyms has an alphabetical list of common and uncommon homonyms, complete with definitions. Some of the definitions are a little snarky, all are funny. I did have a tiny complaint. When a homonym has 2 definitions, usually only one is included.

file a folder for holding papers
phial a small glass bottle

File does not mean just “a folder for holding papers,” it can also be a tool for smoothing rough edges of wood, metal, or even fingernails.

Overall, though, Alan Cooper’s Homonyms will give you a good look at homonyms and their definitions.

The other site is English Homonyms. Both more and less comprehensive than Alan Cooper’s Homonyms, it gives you a good overview of homonym pairs, but there are no definitions. The homonyms here tend to be less obscure and more obvious, although there is some overlap. Instead of coin and quoin, we have bear and bare. The list is still interesting, despite the lack of definitions.

Overall, two very interesting sites that are definitely worth a visit.

Leave a comment

1 Comment

  1. thanks.very good blog and very good share.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: